Lough Gartan on a misty day?

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Where: Unknown

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When: 01 January 1900

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Stony walls, a ruined cabin, scrubby trees, hard-won fields, and the lake make this image of Gartan Lake timeless and yet ancient at the one time. It looks like there is a cemetery on the bottom left corner. What does it look like now?

Photographer: Thomas H. Mason

Collection: Mason Photographic Collection

Date: circa 1900

NLI Ref: M21/41/13

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4373
thomasholmesmason thomasmayne thomashmasonsonslimited lanternslides nationallibraryofireland gartanlake loughgartan countydonegal ulster ruinedcabin stonywalls saintcolumba saintcolmcille

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 27/Oct/2022 08:04:21

    This appears to be a similar view point. ... via https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ "Lough Gartan, taken from near the spot where Saint Columba was born." https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/2067827657/

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 27/Oct/2022 08:05:51

    Is it an old chapel and graveyard?

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 27/Oct/2022 08:15:01

    How about this ?? - goo.gl/maps/fLNvr75J57xiuhYw8

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    suckindeesel

    • 27/Oct/2022 08:17:05

    Lough Nacally in foreground, with Gartan Lough in background Somewhere around here, near St. Colmcille’s Abbey Google Earth Link earth.app.goo.gl/xVthr9 #googleearth

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    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Oct/2022 08:27:40

    The "ruined cabin" is St. Columbmkille's Chapel on the 25". Nearby are an Abbey (in ruins), a holy well and two stone crosses.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Oct/2022 08:30:31

    More info than you probably want from the NIAH: The early ecclesiastical site at Gartan is the reputed birthplace of Colmcille, the greatest of the Donegal saints (Gwynn and Hadcock 1970, 385)*. It presently consists of a complex of sites in and around a graveyard enclosed by a modern stone wall. Within the graveyard are a number of grave markers and the remains of a structure known as the 'Abbey' . This is c. 11.8m E-W and c. 5.2m N-S externally. The walls are .7m wide and survive for the most part .3m in height occasionally reaching .6m. The surviving walls have been much interfered with and in places are obscured. An ashlar quoin occurs in the SW corner. The walls are composed of mortared outer blocks with a core of smaller stones. There are a number of gaps in the S wall. There are two modern graves in the interior. 20m NW of the graveyard on a mound of rock, is the badly preserved remains of a cross . This now survives 1.22m in height and is c. .4m in width. The arms are barely perceptible. The remains of a second badly-preserved cross stands about 20m S of the graveyard. This is 1.4m in height and 0.55m wide. The arms of this cross are also only barely perceptible. A heap of loose stones lie against the S base of the cross. The stones are connected with a turas or pilgrimage performed at the site. To the SE of this cross is a holy well (Ó Muirgheasa No. 61) surrounded by a modern concrete wall. Just SW of the graveyard is St. Columbkilles Chapel . This is probably the chapel described in 1622 as being in repair and having a thatched roof (Royal Commission, 217). Apparently in use in 1810 (Rowan 1979, 303) the E gable and upper part of the E window fell during a storm at the end of the century (Baillie 1898, 275). It was subsequently repaired; the missing jamb fragments of the W door and window in the S wall were replaced with modern concrete. The ruin is a simple, rubble-built rectangular church with ashlar quoins, 6m by 3.95m internally; the walls are c. 2.5m high. The round-headed single-light E window has moulded jambs with splayed ingoings and round-headed rear-arch; the jambs retain sinkings for one vertical and four transverse iron bars. There is a similar window in the S wall; its head and W jamb are modern. Beside it on the E is a wall-press. The door in the S wall and that in the W gable have chamfered jambs and pointed head; the pointed rear-arch of the former is modern. The punch dressing on the doors and windows is of 16th century character and the church is undoubtedly of that date. There is an altar set against the interior of the E gable and it is flanked by two shelf-like slabs projecting from the wall face. Abutting the N wall of the chapel but not bonded into it are the remains of a structure for the most part represented only by the grass-covered lower wall courses. In the interior is a small cairn of stones against which a flagstone with a shallow depression has been placed. The stone is semi-circular, 1.1m × 0.57m and is .16m thick. The circular depression close to the straight edge is .12m in diameter and 0.03m in depth. The complex of sites is located on pasture land sloping towards Lough Akibbon c. 800m to the E.

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    Black and White Fine Art

    • 27/Oct/2022 08:32:20

    Excellent!!

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 27/Oct/2022 08:34:55

    💡SPOT THE DIFFERENCES!💡 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000321716

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    suckindeesel

    • 27/Oct/2022 08:40:42

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ pretty close

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 27/Oct/2022 09:49:17

    The French / Lawrence uncropped original photo includes a man and woman talking with two nuns(?), and a horse and cart bottom left, etc.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Oct/2022 12:55:00

    Paging forward from that Lawrence L_ROY_05787, the first dateable thing i see is Killybegs Ulster Bank from c.1900, then the Industrial School from 1898. Paging back I see L_ROY_05784 with Letterkenny cathedral under construction up to roof level, no spire yet. Built 1891-1901. So I'd guess (and this dating method is unreliable as Donegal pics might be in the catalogue together from different dates) we are very near 1900.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Oct/2022 13:55:48

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Happy to take 1900, along with the usual caveats. Thanks.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 31/Oct/2022 08:07:29

    There is a nineteenth century smiley face in the lake ( :