A Gallant and Four Gallans

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Where: Munster, Co Kerry, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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A gallant gentleman poses with the Four Gallans on his land. Mr. John Moran appears proud of his connection to the land and the ancient history it contains.. Where did the word "Gallans" come from and are they all still standing or have they been sacrificed to progress. I had occasion last weekend to visit Lough Gur in County Limerick and that area has a lot of stone age and later artifacts and clearly some have been lost over the years due to a lack of appreciation of what they were and what they symbolised!

Photographer: Irish Tourism Association Photographer

Collection: Irish Tourism Association Photographic Collection

Date: 1943

NLI Ref: NPA ITA 1002 (Box V)

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 252108
irishtourismassociation irishtourism nationallibraryofireland ireland bwfilmnegatives glassnegatives anunpublisheddatabaseisavailableatnpareadingroomcounter thefourgallans standingstones stoneagemonuments

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  • profile

    an poc

    • 28/Oct/2022 08:23:50

    Some information on galláns: www.jstor.org/stable/25514461

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Oct/2022 08:24:05

    From the catalogue entry: The Four Gallans standing at Duaire, on lands of Mr. John Moran.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 28/Oct/2022 08:26:02

    I think this is what it now looks like - www.megalithicireland.com/Dromod%20Stone%20Circle,%20Kerr...

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 28/Oct/2022 08:34:35

    Mr John Moran looks very like Mr John Lynch, who has an ENORMOUS one, "said to be the second largest in Ireland" - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000576476 Somebody will sort it all out ...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Oct/2022 08:51:58

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Same man, same day by the look of it.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Oct/2022 08:52:52

    The summary there confirms https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy's location: Huge Gallan on John Lynch's lands, Duaire, Dromod, Co. Kerry.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Oct/2022 08:57:26

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy]'s stone circle is not marked on the OSI maps, but there are Gallauns marked in that townland of Dromod. Streetview may match the large one.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 28/Oct/2022 08:59:19

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I’d imagine that this man might be a guide showing the photographer the local antiquities rather than being the landowner.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Oct/2022 09:00:30

    No Morans or Lynchs in Dromod in 1911, mostly just Sullivans.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Oct/2022 09:03:18

    gallán, m. (gs. & npl. -áin, gpl. ~).1. Standing stone, pillar-stone. Archeol: Menhir.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Oct/2022 09:06:24

    Reading those entries again, they don't say the man pictured is either John Moran or John Lynch, only that the stones are on their lands. Edit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy had the same idea!

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    Bernard Healy

    • 28/Oct/2022 09:33:09

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] There’s a Lynch family nearby in Doory, presumably the same as Duaire. www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Kerry/Mastergee...

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    Bernard Healy

    • 28/Oct/2022 09:40:16

    Searching for standing stones in Doory, I came across this. m.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=1900. Is this the same as above or different? I’m not totally convinced by my initial identification but am on my mobile phone rather than my computer & can’t investigate as well as I would like.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 28/Oct/2022 09:40:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Also a number of Morans in neighbouring town lands.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 28/Oct/2022 09:48:13

    I should add that as well as being a townland, Dromod is often used to refer to the area around Waterville in general. Sometimes it can mean the entire Catholic parish which takes in Waterville & the mountainous area around Mastergeehy.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Oct/2022 11:18:05

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy] Using the Lat/Long given, we are a bit North of the last streetview I posted, other side of the hill. Looks promising, the OSI has a line of Gallauns and a single standing stone with a wall close behind it and the hill beyond the wall. Streetview of the single stone. gallauns The arrangement of walls behind the line of standing stones matches today's shot if we are looking NE along the line.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 28/Oct/2022 11:55:36

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] I agree - my initial identification was incorrect. I found a journal article with a description of these stones, along with a diagram which satisfies me that we have the correct site: Stone Alignment Image Description of Doory Stone Row

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Oct/2022 12:31:23

    From the NIAH, the line of stones: This stone row is situated on a plateau on the NW slopes of Coomduff ridge, overlooking the Inny river. The tallest standing stone on the peninsula is located 150m to E . The 8.3m long row consists of three stones, orientated NE-SW, with an outlying monolith 15.5m to SW. The stories of the row decrease in size from NE to SW. The tallest measures 1.9m x 1.4m x .6m and inclines slightly to SE. The second stands 1.2m to SW, and measures 1.2m x .9m x .4m; it inclines towards NW. The third and shortest stone stands 3.8m further to SW, and measures .7m x .5m x .35m. A prostrate slab, 7.6m to S, is largely buried in the ground and its relationship to the row is unclear. The outlier at SW is set roughly in line with the stone row and measures 1.55m x .7m x .6m; packing stones are exposed at its base. Analysing the significance of this monument's orientation, Lynch concluded that it was aligned to W on the S limit of the major lunar standstill. The single stone: Class: Standing stone This standing stone, the tallest in the Iveragh Peninsula, is situated on a terrace on the NW slopes of Coomduff. Standing 4.4m high; its sides rise almost vertically for half its height, then gradually taper towards a pointed top. It is rectangular in plan at base, with dimensions of 1.04m x .42m; NE-SW. A stone row occurs 150m to W.

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 28/Oct/2022 14:29:24

    Interesting.

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    silverio10

    • 29/Oct/2022 19:45:26

    Buenas fotos antiguas .