Well, well, well!

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Where: Connaught, County Sligo, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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The Krazy Katalogger was at it again, too much sauce over the weekend transformed the "Tubbernaltha Holy Well" into the "Subhemaltha Holy Well". Fortunately the act of cataloguing took place long ago and much higher standards apply now!
Tubbernaltha Holy Well in Sligo had sufficient standing for Mr. French to make the journey and take the trouble to record it for posterity. I note a shiny bottle complete with high cork on the stonework and hopefully that was for holy water and not for the dreaded sauce?

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_CAB_03609

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 3450
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland tubbernalthaholywell sligo cosligo connacht

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    suckindeesel

    • 14/Nov/2022 08:45:00

    Tobernalt Holy Well https://flic.kr/p/DLWW4L

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    suckindeesel

    • 14/Nov/2022 08:50:12

    Google Earth Link earth.app.goo.gl/i77Bx1 #googleearth

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    John Spooner

    • 14/Nov/2022 09:24:28

    In the Dundee Evening Telegraph of Thursday 29 March 1900 there was this description:

    Patrick's Wells in Ireland —One of the most picturesque holy wells in Ireland is that known Tubbernaltha, on the shore of Lough Gill, near Sligo. The well gushes out from the face of the cliff to'which it owes its name. The pellucid stream first lingers under the shade of embowering shrubs, the centre of a scene of enchanting loveliness, and then steals away with a gentle murmur to mingle with the waters of the lake. The well has double sanctity, for it was not only blessed by Patrick, who, it seems, baptised his converts there on his way southward through Tirerrill, but in the penal days its waters were used in the celebration of Mass, which was solemnised there beneath an aged tree when no priest dare venture into the town of Sligo.
    Fun fact: I once challenged a colleague to use the word 'pellucid' in a weekly team meeting. I'd paid up the 20p by the time he'd finished the sentence, much to the bemusement of our coworkers.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 14/Nov/2022 09:29:12

    A couple of other 'old' views, with much less vegetation than Mr French's. Via https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/9597361239/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/9600154130/

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    Deirge (Del)

    • 14/Nov/2022 09:30:56

    Actually Suck Diesel I fixed the location of the place on Google Maps, and put a fair few of the images here: commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Tobernalt_Well. I note it says "do not drink the water". Having had much to do with Charlotte Stoker recently ( per www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q114767307 and links ) I recall this flows into Lough Gill and into the Garavogue and out by Sligo Town. When Charlotte wrote of the 1832 Cholera outbreak in Sligo it was thought to be airborne transmission. In the event it was mostly via drinking infected water, the Garavogue being both a sewer and a drinking source for Sligo Town. In which case drinking the Holy Water from this well might well have protected people.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 14/Nov/2022 10:19:04

    I don't know if it was the same visit by Mr French (possibly not, because of a cup on a chain attached to a post; today's photo has a bottle); another instance of three sizes of glass plate from the same trusty tripod - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000333552 (Cabinet) catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000322029 (Royal) catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000330680 (Imperial. Young boy drinking from the cup) And whilst we are there, all three sizes again nearby - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000334358 (Cabinet) catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000041960 (Royal) catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000328628 (Imperial)

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 14/Nov/2022 10:22:57

    And a much earlier stereo pair without the 'decorative' tree near the well - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000566209

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    Deirge (Del)

    • 14/Nov/2022 10:31:12

    A number of things struck me when I visited in July: Firstly there was Molly Fultons, aka the old Kelly's roadhouse not too far away, secondly what a really nice and pleasant spot this is, thirdly there was an agricultural parts supplier nearby. I was struck by how surgical masks were being left as ex-voto offerings tied to trees. But perhaps a way of praying for how the Covid had affected many lives. There were circuits set up for the stations of the Cross and for the praying of the mysteries of the Rosary. The latter included Luminous Mysteries of the Rosary's and I could not remember that from my youth and researched it. Seems they are from JPII's recommendation in apostolic letter Rosarium Virginis Mariae in 2002. It seems a little weird to have four mysteries of the Rosary as four is a more rare number in Christianity than three, albeit 2+0+0+2 = 4 so I suppose there is a connection there. I would have likely to have got to Sligo Town to take a picture of the Hawk's Well Theatre for CC-BY-SA purposes but decided the traffic would not have been worth it just for that.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Nov/2022 12:31:35

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] L_CAB_06849 next to one of those is Summerhill college in Sligo looking fresh, earliest 1891.

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    suckindeesel

    • 14/Nov/2022 20:50:01

    On YouTube youtu.be/Be7cCqKnRPY On megalithicireland www.megalithicireland.com/Tobernalt%20Holy%20Well.html

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    John Spooner

    • 16/Nov/2022 10:08:06

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks for mentioning Charlotte Stoker. I've just read her account of the 1932 cholera outbreak and been through contemporary newspaper reports. More horrific than anything her son Bram wrote, and I can well believe that her stories to him as a child influenced his works.