A home for leprechauns?

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Where: N Ireland, Armagh City Banbridge and Craigavon, UK

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When: Unknown

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After our visit to Trinity College yesterday we felt so uplifted that we had to go all Imperial today! So here we are with a fine Imperial Plate showing Milford House in Co. Armagh. The house itself is obviously for human habitation but that little "Tigín" down at the water was thoughtfully provided for the resident Leprechauns - but only if you believe in them?

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_IMP_4323

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 3604
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland milfordhouse armagh coarmagh ulster northernireland leprechauns lake

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  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Dec/2022 08:50:10

    Flickr sometimes amazes! Looking sad in 2012 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/uahs/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/uahs/6996536249/

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Dec/2022 08:53:57

    From the DIA: 1880- Constructed in mass concrete, & reputedly first in Ireland to be lit by hydroelectric power. Laid out formal gardens with parterres, a fountain and a polygonal conservatory linked to the house for Robert Garmany McCrum. No mention of a house for the Little People.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Dec/2022 09:01:30

    Robert G. McCrum is 71 in the 1901 census, a widower, a JP and Linen Manufacturer. Living in a house with 40 rooms, 15 windows to the front. 81 in 1911. He died in 1915, William McCrum in attendance, so Robert was the owner when this photo was taken.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Dec/2022 09:01:59

    History and (big) people - lordbelmontinnorthernireland.blogspot.com/2014/05/milford...

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Dec/2022 09:11:04

    "Milford House was the one [wonder?] of its age. The most technologically advanced house in 19th century Ireland - the first in Ireland to be lit with hydro electricity. The creation of Robert Garmany McCrum, self made industrialist, benefactor and inventor who revolutionized the linen industry. His son William invented the penalty kick rule in football (which makes Milford world famous!) and his daughter Harriette was a founding member of the women’s suffragette movement in Ireland. By 1880 Milford House had six bathrooms each with a Jacuzzi and Turkish bath and a waterfall in the dining room. From 1936 to 1965 it was home to the Manor House School. ... ..." From - discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/milford-house-p7... The future - www.milfordhouse.org/the-future

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Dec/2022 09:18:06

    The Calendar of Wills says he left £59,437 3s 11d, maybe 5 million pounds today.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Dec/2022 09:19:22

    There is a bust of William in the town: Streetview

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Dec/2022 09:22:27

    Hmm, that may be William Robert's father - William the son seems less likely to be commemorated per the https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia's link: During the Victorian era, the grounds extended to 46 acres. The manor house passed into the ownership of William McCrum in 1915. Never adept at business, he lost heavily in the Wall Street Crash of 1929 and was forced to auction the contents of the house the following year and sell the mill the year after that. Mr McCrum died penniless in 1932 and the Milford House came into the ownership of the Northern Bank. In 1936, the bank leased it to a private boarding school for girls (Manor House School), who bought it outright for £3,000 in 1940. The school closed in 1965; and in 1966 the property was sold to the Northern Ireland Hospital Authority for use as a special care home. This shut in 1988 and since then the property became vacant.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Dec/2022 09:26:01

    Streetview of the house through the gates from 2011 (at least at the time of posting).

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Dec/2022 09:30:49

    Hey NLI - this is another instance of Mr French taking three plate sizes on the same tripod. Spot The Differences! catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000326505 - L_IMP_4323 (this photo) catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000318771 - L_ROY_08120 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000332077 - L_CAB_08388

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Dec/2022 12:28:34

    Paging forward through the L_CAB catalogue I eventually see an 1894 post office in Longford. Other way, and 1891 church in Killorglin. So I think we are after 1894.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Dec/2022 14:34:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Let it be known that Leprechauns are not "Little People" but rather undercover artisan shoemakers with magical powers!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Dec/2022 14:53:44

    The little house with a sandpile outside looks like a playhouse for children, but Robert's children were grown when the house was built. But in 1911 we see a visitor, Millen William, 7. Per https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia's history page above: HARRIETTE (1867-1951), of The Mall, Armagh, married, in 1898, the Rev David Miller, and had issue, four sons, Robert Craig; William McCrum; David Riddall; Edward Wentworth. So this playhouse could be for the grandsons, and the date could be 1900+.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Dec/2022 17:36:25

    Paging back in the L_ROY sequence, I see an Irish Automobile Club sign meaning 1901+. Paging forward, a previously dated shot of the Armagh post office 1903+

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Dec/2022 17:48:01

    I think the IMPs are less likely to be near each other in date as there are a lot less of them, paging back I see the 1901-02 Provincial Bank in Listowel

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Dec/2022 20:31:00

    To further confuse, Mr French visited twice, viewed from the SE - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000332929 (west side of house incomplete) catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000332076 (same visit as today's, with woman in suffragette white and a pram - Harriette?)

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 01/Dec/2022 22:32:34

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Nursemaid?

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    Deirge (Del)

    • 02/Dec/2022 00:52:25

    a lua Axel F "cad atá ar siúl". leabharlann náisiúnta na hÉireann abair 54°20'57.3"N 6°38'36.2"W . Teach Milton agus Stíl na hIodáile. Cinnte nach bhfuil?.

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    Deirge (Del)

    • 02/Dec/2022 01:11:34

    An ndéanfaimid iarracht 54°19'33.6"N 6°41'02.9"W? Breathnaíonn sé go maith anseo!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 02/Dec/2022 09:26:36

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Yes, I think that must be Nurse from the headdress. In 1901, Harriette's eldest Robert is 1, and they have a nurse Margaret Jane Johnson, 35. In 1911, youngest Edward is 4, and there is no nurse in the home, just Servant Ellen McKee, 24.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 02/Dec/2022 11:25:28

    Googling the bust of William McCrum in Milford, I find that is indeed the William who went broke, memorialised because of the link beachcomber above found to the world of kickball: This park is the site which makes Milford village in County Armagh world famous. In 1890 this was a football pitch where William McCrum (1865-1932) a goal keeper in Milford football club and son of R.G Mc Crum of Milford House, invented the penalty kick rule in football which has since been adapted and is now used throughout the world in many sports. The PLACE which revolutionised the world of sport is now a public park with a bust of Mr. Mc Crum by celebrated Belfast artist D.P Pettigrew. Information panels explain the story of the penalty kick and the extraordinary model village of Milford which was created by the Mc Crum family one of Ireland's premier linen manufacturing dynasties.

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    Deirge (Del)

    • 02/Dec/2022 11:56:39

    The house in the photo seems to be listed as (NI) Listed Buildings: (Grade B1): HB15/14/006 ( MANOR HOUSE SPECIAL CARE HOSPITAL MILFORD CO.ARMAGH), nearby a fountain as HB15/14/007 and pavillion as HB15/14/006 D (Address: Pavilion Milford Manor House Ballyards Road Milford Co Armagh BT60 3PD). Theres not a lot here on their Buildings Database Entry. On the NI Historic Environment Map Viewer find Armagh, Count Armagh then head a little west and a little South to Milford and then locate it broadly south and a little west from there.

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    Deirge (Del)

    • 02/Dec/2022 12:05:37

    The "Milford House" back at 3 Victoria Street, Armagh is HB15/17/061 A which is far as I make out is a museum with artifacts from the Milford (Manor) House the subject of the photo. I think its very easy to get between the two and I think the map coordinates here are not a great level of precision.

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    Deirge (Del)

    • 05/Dec/2022 10:32:58

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] I am reasonably certain the people with the magical powers at the NLI have geotagged this image to the wrong location, namely 54°20'57.3"N 6°38'36.2"W whereas in my opinion it should be geotagged to 54.3260,-6.6840 (object location)!

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    Deirge (Del)

    • 05/Dec/2022 10:56:00

    Please note than in researching this image I have become minded that although loaded to Wikimedia commons at commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Milford_House_County._Arm... research indicates the associated Wikidata project has no record for HB15/14/006 and there likely been a breakdown in setting up a more recent feed of Historical Buildings/monuments relating to Northern Ireland. I may attempt to try to check this out, and I may have the wrong end of the stick as usual, but note this is likely of minimal interested to most people on Flickr, though possibly of interest to the NLI. Thankyou.