Long lines and rocky waters

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Where: Munster, Cork, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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The fascination with the Fastnet Rock continues with an different photo for the end of the week. The Krazy Kataloguer describes this as an "Aerial View" of the SS Irene docked at the Fastnet but I imagine that "Aerial" is a bit of a stretch. This was clearly taken from high up on the column of the light.

Photographer: Ball, Robert S. (Robert Stawell), 1840-1913


Collection: Commissioners of Irish Lights Photographic Collection

Date: Circa 1890 - 1909

NLI Ref: NPA CIL147

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 3214
commissionersofirishlightsphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland ireland lighthouse lights robertsball robertstawell thefastnetrock ssirene workers docked blocksandtackles limerickbybeachcomber

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  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 16/Dec/2022 09:14:47

    Previously ... Reverse-ish view (from SS 'Irene II' ?) showing the OLD lighthouse https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/8262872235/ And lots of details here - https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/51024376303/

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    Deirge (Del)

    • 16/Dec/2022 09:34:41

    The name of this image from the Mizzen head visitor centre also confirms "SS Irene"

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    Ghost Radio

    • 16/Dec/2022 10:22:30

    Like how they are drying a few jumpers on the forward rigging.

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    John Spooner

    • 16/Dec/2022 10:55:52

    A close run thing witnessed from the rock and the SS Irene. Reported widely, this is from the Sheffield Evening Telegraph on Saturday 13 July 1901

    THE FASTNET ROCK. PASSENGER STEAMER'S NARROW ESCAPE Crookhaven correspondent telegraphs:—At about three yesterday a large passenger steamer, westward bound, had a miraculous escape from total wreck on the Fastnet, and was saved only through the prompt and decisive action on board, the lifting of the fog at tho nick of time, and by the praiseworthy conduct the light keepers and men the Fastnet rock. The steamer Irene, Captain Fleming, of the Irish Lights, was close the at the time, engaged in connection with the building of the new lighthouse, when those on board were horrified to see a large four-masted passenger steamer coming from the east full on the little Fastnet. The light keepers discharged the alarm gun quickly as possible twice in quick succession, and signalled urgent danger. Before the vessel could slowed or reversed she had, however, apparently touched the rock, she was seen to list to starboard and then to port, and all those who were looking feared serious disaster. The rock referred to is about 400 yards east-south-east of the Fastnet rock, and low tide has only about two fathoms of water over it. No serious damage happened, as she proceeded on her voyage apparently uninjured. It had also transpired that a week before a similar accident nearly occurred to a larger passenger steamer homeward bound. About 11 o'clock she touched the Fastnet on the west side, and a disaster was averted only by the discharge of the Fastnet alarm gun.

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    Oretani Wildlife (Mike Grimes)

    • 16/Dec/2022 11:19:00

    Wrecked at Grimness in 1969 in the Orkneys. The Longhope lifeboat had launched to assist and overturned with the loss of 8 crew in 60 foot waves. www.scotsman.com/arts-and-culture/orkney-lifeboat-tragedy... And some photos of the wreck. photos.orkneycommunities.co.uk/search.asp

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    Oretani Wildlife (Mike Grimes)

    • 16/Dec/2022 19:02:15

    Sorry, the second link doesn't work but search for SS Irene on the page and you'll see them.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 16/Dec/2022 20:52:34

    The Fascinating Fastnet Photographer Limerick A singular fellow called Ball Climbed way up the lighthouse so tall. He took lots of pics Of rocks, cranes, and ships, Which all took a great deal of ... courage.

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    Deirge (Del)

    • 16/Dec/2022 23:02:14

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] As an aside I just noticed the photographer, Robert Stawell Ball, was a noted Royal Astronomer of Ireland, and known for screw theory

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    Deirge (Del)

    • 16/Dec/2022 23:05:36

    Do we know anything about the boat, the SS Irene? I've had a couple of searches but drawn blanks. Thanks.

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    John Spooner

    • 17/Dec/2022 03:27:38

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Some information in the account of her launch at Port Glasgow, in the Port Glasgow Express on 21st October 1898

    STEAMER FOR IRISH LIGHTS COMMISSIONERS. On Saturday Messrs Blackwood & Gordon launched the twin-screw steamer Irene for the Commissioners of Irish Lights, Dublin. Dimensions :—Length, 126 feet ; breadth, 23 feet ; depth, 12ft ; and of about 200 tons gross. The steamer is specially fitted for carrying heavy stone for building the new Fastnet Lighthouse, and for lighthouse work generally, having very heavy winch and windlass. She will be propelled by two sets of compound surface-condensing engines, with cylinders 13 inch and 30 inch in diameter by 21 inch stroke, and supplied by steam from one large single-ended multitubular boiler working at 150 lbs. pressure per square inch. The naming ceremony was performed by Miss Macalpine, daughter of the engineering partner of the firm, in presence of Messrs Idle and Rochfort, as representing the Irish Lights Commissioners

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    John Spooner

    • 17/Dec/2022 04:13:25

    HMM. Lloyds List reported the launch of the Irene, but later said the name had been reported incorrectly, and that the ship's name was IERNE. And Ierne is the name on the clydeships website www.clydeships.co.uk/view.php?ref=2486 , which says she was broken up in 1955.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 17/Dec/2022 08:02:54

    How very confusing! Even the NLI's Krazy Kataloguer used "Ierne" on several photos. Also "II" as if there were two ships - catalogue.nli.ie/Search/Results?lookfor=ierne&type=Al...

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 17/Dec/2022 12:18:35

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia And to confuse things still further, Trinity House (the England and Wales equivalent of Irish Lights) had a steamship called Irene, launched 1890 at Jarrow, blown up by a mine in WW1.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 17/Dec/2022 12:27:32

    RTE Footage of a later Ierne here.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Dec/2022 17:27:36

    In comments over at beachcombers reversish view, we all thought the ship was the Ierne, and in megazoom, there is a box at the back arse end stern of the boat which looks to me to say IERNE

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    silverio10

    • 18/Dec/2022 21:05:41

    Buenas fotos antiguas .

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    Deirge (Del)

    • 19/Dec/2022 13:03:18

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Thanks for that and the information provided by others. I checked the UK Nat. Archives and the catalog entries there seem at first glance inconsistent though may indicate John Rowlands (b. 1886 Kingstown) and Robert C. Hill (b.1877 Slough) previous ship Tearaght of Dublin as possible masters...

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    spesnova10

    • 21/Dec/2022 16:19:13

    I Think you'll find that the ship's name was IERNE