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Where: Cork, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1902

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
All-action photo for you this morning! This is the water chute erected on the River Lee for the Cork Exhibition in 1902/03.

Would love more information on the Cork Exhibition; more exact date; location of the chute (all the usual suspects)...

Date: 1 May 1902 - 31 October 1903 (surely sometime during the summer months of 1902 or 1903 given that the trees are in full leaf)

NLI Ref.: L_NS_00017

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 25354
waterchute chute corkexhibition 1902 1900s riverlee cork ireland munster boats river boatman swanvesta splash flags robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland locationidentified

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  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:25:48

    I Know EVERYTHING about this Photograph. I know the loction, I know what day (and the time of Day) it was taken on. I Know the names of all the people. I even Know the Dogs name...... But I am not telling yet. YOU ALL have some time defore I disclose all.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:27:20

    In 1901 the then Lord Mayor of Cork, Edward Fitzgerald, proposed that Cork should stage an international industrial exhibition in 1902. The proposal was enthusiastically received by all sections of Cork society and planning for the exhibition soon began. The site chosen was an area of parkland between the Cork County Cricket Grounds and Wellington Bridge, now renamed Thomas Davis Bridge. The plans for the exhibition were extraordinarily imaginative and ambitious. It promised to be by far the most spectacular exhibition ever hosted in Cork

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    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:28:25

    It opened on 1 May 1902 amid scenes of celebration and enthusiasm. Its success surpassed all expectations, attracting visitors from all over Ireland, Europe and beyond. After it officially closed on 1 November 1902, it was decided to stage a similar exhibition in 1903. The 1903 exhibition repeated the success of its predecessor and was graced by a visit from Edward VII and Queen Alexandra.

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    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:29:14

    The Cork International Exhibition of 1902 – 1903 finally closed on 31 October 1903

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    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:31:51

    Exhibitions included a Canadian pavilion, art gallery, machinery hall and industrial hall. Entertainments included a water chute, a skating rink, switchback railway, temperance resaturant , a creamery, shooting gallery and an aquarium.

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  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:35:25

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] So, all-knowing one, was the water chute active from 1 May?

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    Gerry Ward

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:39:04

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Was it more spectacular than 'Cork 800'?

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:40:48

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland My First Post was me having a dig at you and Gerry over the comments yesterday. It is totally untrue...... Working on dates times etc..... :)

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    Foxglove

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:43:06

    looks like excellent fun ! and not an un-shod child or black-clad madame in sight

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    Gerry Ward

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:43:53

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] And here's me thinking that it was a dig at me!

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:48:24

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward I have Edited my Comment to correct it.

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    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:50:32

    Interesting illustration here showing the CHUTE - which will help with location Illustration is at the end of the page - scroll down

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:51:30

    Location could be on the Mardyke?

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    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:52:34

    This exhibition ran from 1st May to 1st November. The main site for the exhibition was in what is now Fitzgeralds Park on the western side of the city, whilst the industrial and agricultural exhibits were in an adjscent field, on a site that is now the U.C.C. sports ground. The site was bounded on one side by the River Lee, and on the other side by the Cork & Muskerry Railway, and the Cork Electric Tramway System. On the site were the Industrial Hall, the Machinery Hall, Art Gallery, Canadian Pavillion, and all the various Government Agricultural exhibits and stands. The amusement park contained a Switchback Railway, skating Rink, Shooting Gallery, Aquarium, Temperance Restaurant and a creamery.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:55:08

    The Anglo-Celt newspaper has an article on the Cork Exhibition - The Mecca of Irishmen this year - that was published on Saturday, 3 May 1902 and the chute was in place then:

    The water chute is reached by a path through the riverside gardens outside the Industrial Hall. The chute which is 70 feet high, was built at Cork at a cost of £3,000. Gondolas, electric launches, wherries, etc., will ply on the river. To the west of the water chute will be found a number of side shows, including an exhibit of wood-carving, submarine diving pavilion, temperance restaurant.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:58:19

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Hooray. Another Three Post Ment! Well done, btw.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:59:10

    The success of the 1902 season prompted the Exhibition Committee to re-opon again in 1903. The highlight of the 1903 season was the visit to the exhibition grounds on 1st August, during their Irish tour, of King Edward V11 and Queen Alexandra. Following the conclusion of the Exhibition in 1903, most of the buildings were dismantled, but ”The Shrubberies” and grounds were presented to the citizens of Cork as a recreational area.

  • profile

    FrigateRN

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:59:12

    Terrific old picture and doesn't it look fun?

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 16/Nov/2012 09:59:32

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Incidentally, did you beat my two minute record?

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    ccferrie

    • 16/Nov/2012 10:03:36

    I've found the location maps.google.ie/maps?q=Thomas+Davis+Bridge,+cork&hl=en... The houses on the far side of the river match those in the photo. And I think I can spot the Cork Public Museum on the drawing on Cllr McCarthy's website. Fitzgerald Park seems to have been the site of the main exhibition buildings.

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    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 10:06:21

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I was not even close to it...

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    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 10:07:58

    Presume Fitzgerald Park is called after the Lord Mayor at the time of the Exhibition?

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    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 10:20:34

    From Sundays well Boating and Tennis Club For instance, it (the Club) was uniquely linked with the Cork International Exhibition of 1902/03, principally because it lent its grounds to the Exhibition, and the present clubhouse was built by the Exhibition Committee for visiting dignitaries, which included King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra

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    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 10:24:29

    Have a look at this video You Tube - Cork Exhibition Procession 1902 7.31 Mins

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    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 10:30:50

    Here is another Video Final of the International Cup at Cork Regatta (1902)

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    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 10:35:57

    It Says UCC Sports day 1902 - but it must have been part of the Exhibition You can even see the water chute at about 30 seconds into the video - UCC Sports Day 1902

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 16/Nov/2012 10:44:41

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Love that video and others of that vintage. It's like seeing our photos come to life!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 16/Nov/2012 10:45:43

    Found in the Nenagh News of Saturday, 1 November 1902:

    Accident at Cork Exhibition - Young Lady thrown into the water: On Saturday night, about 9.30, as one of the boats of the Water Chute, which contained a number of trippers, reached the water, one of its occupants, a young lady, was thrown out. Almost immediately a lad who was standing near the chute jumped in and brought the young lady safely ashore, for which he was warmly applauded. Great excitement prevailed at the time, so much so that, in the eagerness of those present to see what was taking place in the water, another young lady who was standing near the edge was thrown in, but was rescued without much difficulty.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 10:55:47

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/7247430400/ This must have been for the same Trip which took in the Cork Exhibition?

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    Swordscookie

    • 16/Nov/2012 11:09:38

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Final of International Cup between Leander of England and Berlin of Germany. As far as I know after that race the Leander Club donated the Leander Trophy to Cork regatta for Senior 8's. The trophy which is a Galleon in full sail and made of silver is one of the most beautiful trophies for any sport in Ireland. I was in a crew that won that trophy in 1969 on the Marina in Cork. not boasting or anything;-)

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 16/Nov/2012 11:15:50

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie] Any photographic evidence of your victory? (Really just want to poke fun at you in your rowing kit ;)

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 16/Nov/2012 11:19:12

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks for the location, Ciaran! Location Identified tag now added...

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 11:26:48

    Another quaint Video from 1902 Cork - Mitchell and Kenyon -1902 Train Journey Muskerry light rail, Cobh and Albert Quay

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 11:34:11

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie] Picture of your trophy about half way down the page... - The Swordscookie Trophy IMPRESSIVE

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    Swordscookie

    • 16/Nov/2012 11:39:49

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Sorry Carol, my legs were never considered suitable for public viewing. The trophy as Danny has demonstrated is some piece of silverware, and is still one of my proudest sporting achievements. I was correct about the donation of the trophy which happened after the International Cup race in the video above!

  • profile

    Bariom43

    • 16/Nov/2012 11:58:56

    Fascinating. How interesting that they had a Temperance restaurant:)

  • profile

    Vab2009

    • 16/Nov/2012 12:04:11

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Ohh - we are missing your legs! That trophy is impressive!

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 12:04:20

    Here is the Best video of them all - in which it states that the water Chute was NOT ready for the opening day 1st May - but it was ready one week later see 1.15 mins into the video - there are also shots of building work and a panorama of the whole exhibition grounds, filimed from the top of our Water Chute no less 2.48 mins in *** Must view ***

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 12:17:06

    More Rowing as part of the exhibition - including the Leander piece 21st to 23rd July 1902

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    Swordscookie

    • 16/Nov/2012 12:18:57

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Ooooh Carol you are wicked! I just clicked on the ROWING KIT link on that comment and remembered all the comments that went before on that particular photograph. I've just blushed bright scarlet at the suggestion.

  • profile

    ccferrie

    • 16/Nov/2012 12:19:20

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Not a hardhat or vizi-vest to be seen on that building site! :-)

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 16/Nov/2012 12:22:41

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Wicked? Moi?

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    Swordscookie

    • 16/Nov/2012 12:28:21

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Bien sur ma cherie, toi!

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 16/Nov/2012 14:05:11

    you can still use a water slide in October there? Boy we'd freeze over here in the colonies at that time of year...

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 16/Nov/2012 14:06:13

    www.studygroup.org.uk/Exhibitions/Pages/1902%20Cork.htm Blueprints/plans of the fair.

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    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 14:18:32

    See Links to short movies from 1902 posted Here http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/7438815092/ and here http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/7548442648/

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 16/Nov/2012 14:32:33

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Just looked at the second link to the rowing final. the first clip really demonstrates the hazards of rowing on a busy waterway. First having to cope with the bow-wave of a steamer and then having to take drastic action to avoid being run down by a sailboat! I was just admiring how the 8 coped so well with the bow-wave and then their rowing went all to pot and they made a very violent manouevre. Avoiding the sailboat was a good idea;-) A wave like that could easily swamp an eight.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 16/Nov/2012 14:37:57

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie I know the old addage "steam (power) gives way to sail" but in this instance surely the sailboat should have tried to avoid the eight?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Nov/2012 14:42:14

    Let's not forget this popular Cork image from 1902: Born to Run

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    Swordscookie

    • 16/Nov/2012 14:42:36

    If it was being steered by a tiller then the sailor may not have seen them! They are very low to the water even if they are sixty feel long and there is no point in arguing about right of way in a situation like that.

  • profile

    dorameulman

    • 16/Nov/2012 17:10:21

    Great photo.

  • profile

    Jasper68(BATH)2018

    • 17/Nov/2012 08:14:19

    Great photo. The question, is it still there ?

  • profile

    maorlando - God keeps me as I lean on Him!!

    • 17/Nov/2012 08:30:49

    Amazing... great B&W photo and amazing research & info comments!!! Way to go my wonderful Irish friends!!!

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 19/Nov/2012 10:49:02

    Whyyyy are we waiting, why eye are we waiting?

  • profile

    guliolopez

    • 19/Nov/2012 12:03:26

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/160350] No. It was removed after the exhibition. Daly's Bridge was later built on the site of the chute. [http://www.flickr.com/photos/silyld/186322516/]

  • profile

    abandoned railways

    • 20/Nov/2012 14:13:22

    Before the bridge was built, a few ferries operated to Sundays well. During construction the ferrymen caused damage as a protest to the loss of their jobs.

  • profile

    eyelightfilms

    • 30/Nov/2012 10:10:42

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie I live just up the road from the Leander Club in Henley. Didn't know they had Cork connections.

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 30/Nov/2012 14:30:24

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/eyelightfilms They are one of the great clubs in the world of competitive rowing. In the past many UK crews would travel to Irish venues to attend regattas often borrowing boats so they did not have the trouble and expense of transporting 60'long eights with them. On this occasion they presented the trophy, a model of the Leander Galley (on wheels), to Cork Regatta committee. It is a very prestigious trophy not least because of its unique design! http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie/8190759604/in/photostream

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Dec/2012 11:54:44

    Another angle