The Palace - Twice Nightly at 7 & 9

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Where: Northern Ireland, Belfast, United Kingdom

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When: 01 January 1910

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The marvellous Cirque and Grand Opera House in Belfast. There's no way a date for this one will defeat us - a poster above the Gallery entrance says "Palace Theatre. Chas Majiltons Co. The Trippers. Tho Hardeen". So when did that combination of performers show the theatre-going people of Belfast a good time??

Date: Circa 1909?? (post-1905, and no later than 1909)

NLI Ref.: L_ROY_08983

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 32320
operahouse cirque grandoperahouse cirqueandgrandoperahouse belfast antrim ireland northernireland ulster music drama thepalace palacetheatre posters musichall chasmajiltons charlesmajiltons thetrippers theohardeen hardeen davidallensons davidallen irishbillposting williamstreet formintwos sidecar horse gaslighting stainedglass robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection glassnegative theodorehardeen greatvictoriastreet glengallstreet nationallibraryofireland

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  • profile

    Michiel2005

    • 26/Mar/2013 09:24:23

    Theo Hardeen? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodore_Hardeen Brother of Houdini.

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    robinparkes

    • 26/Mar/2013 09:26:31

    Post 1905 anyway for the trams are electric. I can't add anymore apart from this streetview maps.google.com/maps?q=Great+victoria+Street,+Belfast&...

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    John Spooner

    • 26/Mar/2013 09:27:01

    Can't help with the Palace, but Mr Chas Majiltons's celebrated company performed Geo R. Sims' famous farcical comedy "the Gay City" (which has achieved an Enormous Success throughout the Country) from Sept 11th - 16th 1882 at the New Theatre Royal. (Private Boxes 40s, 30s, 25s and 20s; Balcony Stalls 4s; Upper Circle 2s; Pit 1s; Gallery 6d.) (Belfast Newsletter.) So 'The Trippers' wasn't his first trip to Belfast

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 26/Mar/2013 09:36:48

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/govert1970 I don't believe it! Younger brother of Harry Houdini - that's excellent.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 26/Mar/2013 09:37:37

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks Robin. I've a hunch around 1910, but now we know definitely post-1905.

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    John Spooner

    • 26/Mar/2013 09:39:17

    The Majilton Family, including Charles and Frank

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    John Spooner

    • 26/Mar/2013 09:52:00

    According to Wikipedia, "It was renamed the Palace of Varieties in 1904, although it reverted to its original name in 1909", so 1909 at the latest. Wikipedia

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 26/Mar/2013 09:52:10

    Hoot, Hoot! From The Derry People on Saturday, 3 September 1910:

    St. Columb's Hall, Londonderry. Twice Nightly Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, September 5, 6, 7, 1910. Majilton's Eccentric Comedians (The World's Laughter Makers) in the funniest of all Musical Comedies: "THE TRIPPERS." Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, September 8, 9, 10. The Screamingly Funny Musical Farcical Comedy: "A SCOTSMAN IN PARIS."

  • profile

    Rienk Mebius

    • 26/Mar/2013 09:54:49

    "Every evening at lighting up o’clock sharp and until further notice in Feenichts Playhouse. (Bar and conveniences always open, Diddlem Club douncestears" But that was Dublin I suppose. Page 219, lines 1-3.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 26/Mar/2013 10:01:01

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner I sit corrected. 1909 latest - thanks John.

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    John Spooner

    • 26/Mar/2013 10:04:43

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland An explanation of the word "Cirque" near the apex of the facade. A description of the exterior in The Belfast Newsletter on 7th Dec 1895, shortly before the opening:

    It might be needful to mention here that "Cirque" is an intimation that the building can be used for a circus performance at any time, the architect having by an ingenious arrangement designed a sinking stage, wheron the usual arena can be arranged.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 26/Mar/2013 10:05:53

    Had Theodore Hardeen turned to a life of international crime? From The Southern Star on Saturday, 23 September 1905:

    No more sensational or more mysterious act has recently taken place than that of Mr Theo. Hardeen, whose marvellous trick of escaping from locked handcuffs is baffling the smartest English and foreign detectives.

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    John Spooner

    • 26/Mar/2013 10:05:56

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Unless (a) they hadn't bothered to take the 'Palace' sign down or (b) Wikipedia is wrong.

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    ccferrie

    • 26/Mar/2013 10:14:55

    Here's the source for the wikipedia info www.arthurlloyd.co.uk/BelfastTheatres.htm#opera

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 26/Mar/2013 10:31:00

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks for the source, and http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner I'd be happy enough because it says "Palace Theatre" on the poster...

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    John Spooner

    • 26/Mar/2013 10:35:14

    In 1905 the Dundee Courier describes "The Trippers" as "The new screamer ... fun without vulgarity".

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 26/Mar/2013 10:39:19

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Isn't the reference to the detectives just an indication of his superior skills? It's relatively easy to pull the wool over the eyes of Joe Public in your act, but a really convincing trick is to baffle detectives, who really know their handcuffs.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 26/Mar/2013 10:43:56

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Absolutely, I was only joking. But Hardeen was very sure of his skills... In the Irish Times on Friday, 3 October 1902, Theodore Hardeen was playing the Tivoli in Dublin:

    The World's Greatest Handcuff and Trunk Manipulator, Hardeen, offers £25 to anyone who can open and escape from the Handcuffs and Leg Irons used in his act. Hardeen also challenges anyone to bring handcuffs from which he himself is unable to escape.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 26/Mar/2013 11:03:11

    Apparently there was a Houdini/Hardeen imitator who called himself Leo Houdeen, the Great Handcuff King Leo Houdeen poster "Bring your own handcuffs. Police specially invited." Leo Houdeen picture Real name Henry Barton Turner. More info on his life here.

  • profile

    Gerry Ward

    • 26/Mar/2013 11:58:11

    This has to be before 1907 when the Royal Hippodrome was opened. Building of the Hippodrome commenced in 1906 ("Central Belfast - A Historical Gazetteer", Marcus Patton, UAHS), Patton cites the "Irish Builder" 1907 (page 24) as source.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Mar/2013 12:16:12

    No Hippodrome next door. [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward] Snap!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Mar/2013 12:26:59

    A full house in 1917.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Mar/2013 12:32:42

    A earlier nli picture, from when the Hippodrome site was a row of houses.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Mar/2013 12:40:15

    and I think this one shows hoardings in front of those houses, ready for the demoliiton (and a Palace 7 & 9 sign!).

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Mar/2013 12:43:37

    The building behind the site at right is the Chancellor Memorial Reformed Presbyterian Church on College Street South. (Thanks, [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward] )

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 26/Mar/2013 12:50:04

    Thanks http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward and http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley! So really could be during 1906 as construction of the Hippodrome hasn't started?

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    Gerry Ward

    • 26/Mar/2013 13:10:38

    'College Street South' is the old name for the lower section of Grosvenor Road.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 26/Mar/2013 13:20:42

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward And are we here on Victoria Street?

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    robinparkes

    • 26/Mar/2013 13:36:59

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Great Victoria Street actually. Victoria Street is elsewhere. The end of Glengall Street is to the left of the Grand Opera House.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 26/Mar/2013 14:07:11

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward Thanks both of you! Added to map now.

  • profile

    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 27/Mar/2013 03:23:39

    The Screamingly Funny Musical Farcical Comedy: "A SCOTSMAN IN PARIS." I want to see this. Screamingly funny, with music and farcical comedy. Sounds like a riot.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 27/Mar/2013 03:35:02

    I don't know about the Trippers, but here are ... the Majiltons upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/95/The_Maj...

  • profile

    robinparkes

    • 27/Mar/2013 07:49:31

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley The Chancellor Memorial Reformed Presbyterian Church did not survive. It succumbed to yet another car bomb. I was involved with roof repairs on a well know building in Glengall Street following the two bombs in that street.

  • profile

    billh35

    • 27/Mar/2013 18:41:43

    Would that have been the Unionist Party HQ or the Bus Station?

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    robinparkes

    • 29/Mar/2013 22:27:11

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Unionist Party HQ. Did major work first time. Less had to be done the second time. It's amazing the damage the downdraught causes.

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    billh35

    • 13/Apr/2013 15:52:51

    High tide in 1969!: High Tide in Great Victoria Street as an Ulsterbus Leyland PD2/10c passes the Europa Hotel, Belfast during flooding in 1969.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Apr/2013 11:17:00

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Remarkable! This is Lagan water?

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    billh35

    • 14/Apr/2013 11:24:31

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I think it's more likely to be the Blackwater which I believe is culverted on the other side of the Europa (ie behind the photographer). I think Gerry may know more.

  • profile

    billh35

    • 14/Apr/2013 11:26:24

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] I think the wall to the right in this image of Gerry's flic.kr/p/4uHF2x shows where the Blackwater is now culverted under Gt Victoria St. and it would have been this that was in flood. It's now culverted under this maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=river+blackwater+belfast&hl=...

  • profile

    Gerry Ward

    • 14/Apr/2013 11:58:11

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] You are correct, Bill, except that it is the Blackstaff, (not Blackwater). The BBC's Blackstaff Studios are built over it on the other side of Great Vctoria Street, hence their name. Here is another reminder of the Blackstaff where it crosses the Dublin Road, nearby!

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    billh35

    • 14/Apr/2013 12:07:38

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward] The culvert was also between the Ulsterbus park and the N.I. Carriers yard - you can just see it behind this coach in this photo Ulsterbus Tours 576 (MTV 47P) at Great Victoria Street depot However it is now completely underground at that point - maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=Glengall+Street,+Belfast&hl=...

  • profile

    Gerry Ward

    • 14/Apr/2013 12:21:23

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] You'll get great information on it in either of Des O'Reilly's excellent books: "The Bog Meadows and the River Blackstaff and/or "Rivers of Belfast"!

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    billh35

    • 14/Apr/2013 13:07:08

    Is the Blackstaff the river which came down through Ballysillan Playing Fields towards the city? If you look at this mapping.dardni.gov.uk/strategicFloodMap/index.aspx it rises above Silverstream just below the Upper Crumlin Road (beyond the Horseshoe Bend).

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Apr/2013 13:27:02

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward Ah thanks, I had checked on the map and it was so far to the Lagan that I was thinking that depth of water could only have been caused by a hurricane!

  • profile

    billh35

    • 29/Apr/2013 16:19:53

    I think this view is even older - given the terrace houses still in situ: Glengall Street and the Palace Theatre

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    billh35

    • 30/Apr/2013 07:59:36

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland So what's the river in Ballysillan Playing Fields?

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    Gerry Ward

    • 30/Apr/2013 12:04:44

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Bill, the Silver Stream joins with the Crumlin Road Stream just north-west of A55 Ballysillan Road where it becomes Ballysillan Stream. It flows across the Playing Fields where it joins with the Cliftonville Stream near Alliance Avenue / Jamaica Street. This then becomes the Glenwood River, crossing Ballygomartin Road to become the Farset, which flows fairly straight from there to the Lagan, down the centre of High Street.

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    billh35

    • 30/Apr/2013 15:39:33

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward Hence the Silver Stream Estate! Not sure about how it gets to the Ballygomartin as there is a massive hill (which is Ardoyne) in the middle.

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    billh35

    • 02/May/2013 07:57:29

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward Thanks!