Market Square, Letterkenny

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Where: Donegal, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1928

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Centuries of transport methods colliding in the bustling Market Square at Letterkenny in Donegal...

Date: 1928??

From Wikipedia, Donegal motor registration numbers were: IH 1 to IH 9999 (Dec 1903 - Jan 1952)

NLI Ref: EAS_1114

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 51751
marketsquare letterkenny donegal ireland ulster market boyle shops mahonys drapers drapery hibernianbank bank hotel policeman eason easoncollection easonson glassnegative hegartyshotel bar pub publichouse generalgrocer singersewingmachines barber bicycles barberspole cars automobiles motorcars carts horses donkeys stalls ih2183 children 20thcentury singer sewingmachines bankofireland charliechaplin nationallibraryofireland

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 02/Apr/2013 07:56:47

    Mahony was there in 1911. Boyle, on the other hand, doesn't seem to have been.

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    derangedlemur

    • 02/Apr/2013 08:00:16

    May as well have the OSI link: maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,616768,911347,7,9

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    Niall McAuley

    • 02/Apr/2013 08:06:37

    Here is a Streetview, but the nice trees planted in the Square now make getting this angle impossible.

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    derangedlemur

    • 02/Apr/2013 08:55:47

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Well, it looks like we have this one covered. Nobody else seems inclined to add anything.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 02/Apr/2013 09:43:44

    What about the cars - they should produce a date? Guessing mid 1920s.

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    derangedlemur

    • 02/Apr/2013 09:47:22

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia They seem to be mostly Model Ts, which means post-1908. The wire wheels also indicate post-1908, which doesn't get you anywhere. You need a vintage car bod to date these more accurately. Edit: From Wikipedia - "Wheels were wooden artillery wheels, with steel welded-spoke wheels available in 1926 and 1927." If that means wire spokes, it would help.

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 02/Apr/2013 09:47:53

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] What a wonderful and detailed shot telling numerous stories all at once! The gaggle of girls posing for the camera - where are they now and how did their lives pan out? Emigration, marriage, TB, single life - we'll never know but each had a story to tell. All the menfolk at the fair are in their middle or elderly years and can you imagine trying today to understand their broad Donegal accents and what they'd make out of our mid-Atlantic pebbles in the mouth spake:-) There's a herd of donkeys behind the gaggle of girls and that's as many donkeys as I've ever seen in a shot together with the horses and yet motoring cars are plentiful! To the left of the girls as you look at the shot there's a car with the spare wheel mounted on a gate, an ingenious way of keeping the spare safe and easy to access when it needs changing. Wonderful shot Carol, it may not excite the same interest as others but it is a joy to behold!

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 02/Apr/2013 09:54:43

    Wire wheels were not available for the Model T until January 1926, it says here: www.nwvs.org/Technical/MTFCA/Articles/3403FordWireWheels.pdf

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    robinparkes

    • 02/Apr/2013 10:10:16

    Love the photo Carol. My wife's home place is only 10 miles from Letterkenny. I still use the old road by Listack into Oldtown.

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    FrigateRN

    • 02/Apr/2013 10:14:24

    Once again a picture that just beg for comment. The Charlie Chaplin note is priceless.

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    DannyM8

    • 02/Apr/2013 10:55:07

    The previous Easons photo in the archive is of the Cardinal O'Donnell Statue. He did not become a Cardinal until 1924.

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    DannyM8

    • 02/Apr/2013 10:57:15

    Name:JONES, FRANCIS WILLIAM DOYLE *# Building:CO. DONEGAL, LETTERKENNY, CATHEDRAL OF ST EUNAN (RC) Date:1927 Nature:Statue of Cardinal Patrick O'Donnell. Refs: Theo Snoddy, Dictionary of Irish Artists: 20th Century (1st edition, 1996), 147.

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    DannyM8

    • 02/Apr/2013 10:58:09

    Therefore if the archive of Eason photos is chronological this is after 1927.

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    DannyM8

    • 02/Apr/2013 11:05:00

    A Dog - Well spotted http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley

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    DannyM8

    • 02/Apr/2013 11:29:09

    There are electric lights which would suggest later than 1926 . LETTERKENNY URBAN DISTRICT ELECTRIC LIGHTING ORDER, 1926. - FINANCE BILL, 1926—THIRD STAGE (RESUMED). Friday, 18 June 1926

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    Joefuz

    • 02/Apr/2013 12:44:39

    The hotel is long gone. I think it's now a small shopping arcade. The building to its left is the Bank of Ireland these days and still looks just like that. There are probably just as many cars around the square these days, but most of them are taxi's. The horses and donkeys are sadly long gone.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2013 14:16:08

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Thank you both for location! Now added to our map.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2013 14:17:16

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Thank you! :)

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2013 14:19:23

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Love the expression "home place"! And apologies for my error with IK instead of IH on my note. Brain only warming up after the loooonnnngggg weekend.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2013 14:22:20

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Perhaps not strictly chronological, but all of these Letterkenny photos must surely have been taken around the same time...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2013 14:23:51

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Should I tag for Charlie Chaplin? Who's to say he might not have been on a flying visit to Letterkenny?

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2013 14:27:24

    Thanks to everyone for dating information (car spokes, statue, electrification). Will we go for Circa 1928 just to allow some wiggle room?

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 02/Apr/2013 18:35:19

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I understand that ladies wiggle (and very nice to see too!) whereas what we need here is a little wriggle room (which worms and men do from time to time!)

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2013 19:08:22

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie You say potato. I say potato. :)

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 02/Apr/2013 21:30:33

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Tag added. Charlie Chaplin was spotted in Sydney too - wiggled my memory!

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    eyelightfilms

    • 02/Apr/2013 23:32:24

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] The cars tagged wire wheels aren't Model T's though. The only Model T Ford I can positively identify is the black car facing us at left, which has wooden wheels. Definitely late 20's though from the cars. That's quite a gaggle of donkeys.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 03/Apr/2013 03:10:14

    That Singer Sewing machines logo caught my eye... It seems to be of a more modern looking woman, not a Victorian era woman. That logo was used in the 1920-1950 period, per the Smithsonian here. www.sil.si.edu/DigitalCollections/Trade-Literature/Sewing.... They seem to have reverted to the older logo in 1921 for some reason. I can only see one leg under the table, the 1920 version shows two legs. Likely later than not. From the book here, that was printed in the 1930's, looks like the logo we see on the sign. So late 1920's/early 1930's isn't far off... scheong.wordpress.com/2012/07/25/singer-no-99-sewing-mach...

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 03/Apr/2013 03:31:45

    Any collectors of the glass insulators as I tagged on the pole? Here in Canada it seems the ceramic ones didn't come in until the 1960's... The ones in the picture don't look like they're made of glass, they aren't see through.

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    derangedlemur

    • 03/Apr/2013 06:11:28

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/eyelightfilms I assumed they were late Model Ts with the roundy radiators and bonnets. What are they really - Austin 7s?

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    eyelightfilms

    • 03/Apr/2013 13:35:20

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Nothing looks small enough to be an Austin 7. Possibly another Model T on far left in the background, but T's of this vintage all had black radiators. They lost the brass radiator in about 1916, and those rads are much more angular.

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    richard39a

    • 04/Apr/2013 08:29:01

    Another one of your fabulous photographs. You seem to have the knack of selecting photographs that are full of the lives of ordinary people going about their daily business without the stomach-churning insipidity and sentimentality typical of English photographs of the time (if there are any).

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 04/Apr/2013 09:51:00

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks for all the Singer sign work. Also does that mean we had ceramic insulators way earlier than you did in Canada??

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 04/Apr/2013 10:06:02

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Thanks for the compliment, but I think you're being a bit unfair about English photographs of the time (of which I'm sure there are millions). Have a look at whatsthatpicture's stream for just one tiny example of an individual who loves photographs of "ordinary people going about their daily business", not to mention institutions like the National Media Museum with gorgeous photographs in their Francis Bedford set (equivalent of our William Lawrence)

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    excellentzebu1050

    • 04/Apr/2013 21:26:53

    Really Excellent work !