Shome mishtake, shurely?

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Where: Northern Ireland, Belfast, United Kingdom

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When: 01 January 1903

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We uncovered a gremlin catalogue record! This fine edifice was allegedly Beauparc, Slane, Co. Meath. Now if you have a look at some of our Beauparc photos, you'll see that "one of these things is not like the other. One of these things just doesn't belong".

Its glass plate negative number came in the middle of a load of Belfast city centre images, and it turns out this is the Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast - thanks to Niall McAuley and Tin of beans!

Date: Between 1903 and 1914

NLI Ref.: L_CAB_04203

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 39065
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection glassnegative royalvictoriahospital belfast ireland ulster northernireland royalvictoriainfirmary nightingalewards eastwing westwing plenumventilation grosvenorroad antrim henmancooper mclaughlinharvey gsflower plenumventilationsystem nationallibraryofireland locationidentified 20thcentury

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  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Jun/2013 08:41:00

    First guess, it's a hospital. Look at the older men on the balconies in the sun. They don't look like workers on a break to me.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 07/Jun/2013 08:42:25

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley I'd agree, Niall - those balconies and the terraced areas look just right for patients to "take the air".

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    O Mac

    • 07/Jun/2013 08:50:04

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] You're right. It's the Royal Victoria Hospital Belfast.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Jun/2013 08:51:40

    The Royal Victoria Infirmary in Belfast, see Archiseek!

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    Vab2009

    • 07/Jun/2013 08:54:18

    Yep - definitely the RVH. (I trained there)

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    Vab2009

    • 07/Jun/2013 08:57:08

    The long "nightingale" wards and the two big blocks are East and West wings. The wards were built with balconies for air and the whole lot was built with a new fangled ventilation system.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Jun/2013 08:57:24

    Streetview

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    Vab2009

    • 07/Jun/2013 09:01:11

    There is a good bit if history here www.ums.ac.uk/rvh.html

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    Vab2009

    • 07/Jun/2013 09:05:21

    And this links is about the building ventilation system www.hevac-heritage.org/landmark_buildings/institutional/i... I believe one of the old wards survives but I have not been up there to see it. The two wings are there still.

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    DannyM8

    • 07/Jun/2013 09:22:29

    Well done all - great detective work

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 07/Jun/2013 09:28:12

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Thank you very much! That explains that then. It really looks quite snazzy in both our photo and your postcard...

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 07/Jun/2013 09:38:47

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland The credit is Nialls

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    Swordscookie

    • 07/Jun/2013 09:53:12

    It was some edifice even for those times of grand projects. Quite the super hospital and in full living colour on a green field site those bricks must have been very impressive. Well done Niall.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 07/Jun/2013 09:56:50

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] You're all so gentlemanly! Thank you http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley! :)

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 07/Jun/2013 10:02:52

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Can we take that 1901 on Archiseek as date of construction? Or date those photos/postcards were produced? Because the structure looks all shiny and new in our photograph... As from http://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009's link, money was found in the 1890s but no "official" opening date there...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 07/Jun/2013 10:03:47

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009 We have East and West Wings here at Library Towers too. Was "nightingale" a style of ward, or specific to RVH?

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 07/Jun/2013 10:07:59

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland there is a record number of Canidae in the profile photos today.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 07/Jun/2013 10:19:27

    The Freeman's Journal of Thursday, 1 June 1899 reports a meeting of the Executive Committee of the New Royal Victoria Hospital. Plans had been worked out by the architects and staff committee:

    ... They provide for about 300 beds in 19 wards, generally of 16 beds each, with the necessary accessory rooms, including a certain number of single wards, thereby avoiding both staircases and lifts, in addition to which there is the extern department, consisting of a large waiting hall surrounded by a number of consulting and retiring rooms ... In addition to the facilities in administration secured by having all the wards on the one floor level the arrangement is particularly adapted for simplifying the application of the plenum system of ventilation, which the committee have decided to adopt.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 07/Jun/2013 10:20:56

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Is there?

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    O Mac

    • 07/Jun/2013 10:28:41

    "Completed in 1906" WikipediA

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 07/Jun/2013 10:34:56

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Brilliant! So consensus? Does this structure look "completed"? Can we safely say this was taken in 1906, or at least between 1906 and 1914 (end of Lawrence Collection timeframe)?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Jun/2013 11:21:21

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] But you beat me to it by 2 whole minutes! :D [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] The place looks finished, but brand new. I'd be a bit dubious of the wiki date. The DIA says 1903: New hospital for 300 patients. Tenders sought Aug 1900. Foundations laid 1901. Officially opened 27 Jul 1903 by Edward VII & Queen Alexandra. Builder: McLaughlin & Harvey. Clerk of Works: G.S. Flower. Plenum Ventilation system subject of libel dispute with George Henry Bibby.

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    Gerry Ward

    • 07/Jun/2013 11:24:29

    The RVH was the world’s first air-conditioned public building. The corridor of 20 wards was recently demolished as part of the hospital’s redevelopment. Here is an interesting article by Dr RSJ Clarke, Prof of Anaesthetics, about the corridor, the naming and the benefactors of each of the 20 wards.

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    O Mac

    • 07/Jun/2013 12:28:35

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward] Photo of demolition and heating and ventilation plant building. www.geograph.ie/photo/1712413

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 07/Jun/2013 13:01:17

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley I'd be guided by your being dubious. 1903-1914 then...

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    O Mac

    • 07/Jun/2013 15:46:17

    McLaughlin & Harvey the builders, are still going strong.

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    archiseek

    • 07/Jun/2013 17:29:30

    The 1901 date on the site is the date of the publication of the images. archiseek.com/2009/1901-royal-victoria-infirmary-belfast/...

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 08/Jun/2013 01:30:09

    We have one of those RVH hospitals here too... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Victoria_Regional_Health_Centre, well two actually en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Victoria_Hospital,_Montreal

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    ccferrie

    • 10/Jun/2013 00:15:25

    I thought these buildings might be the remains of some of the above but there are some subtle differences and they're not quite in the right place - must have been built around the same time though

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    Gerry Ward

    • 10/Jun/2013 01:13:00

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] What you are looking at is the King Edward Building, built after 1913, further up the Grosvenor Road, at its junction with Falls Road. The two buildings in the NLI photo have now been linked and they are the wings of this building.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 10/Jun/2013 08:07:51

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward] There is a nice bird's eye view of the building at Bing

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    ajw423uk

    • 12/Jun/2013 19:39:26

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Nightingale as in Florence Nightingale who introduced it. It means that typical style of ward in hospitals of the Victorian and Edwardian eras with the two rows of beds and the big windows to let in light and air.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Jun/2013 16:27:58

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/ajw423uk That style still in vogue, if on a smaller scale...

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    Vab2009

    • 15/Jun/2013 17:57:02

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Apologies - I did not see your question about the "nightingale" wards. Yes, named after Florence Nightingale who introduced and them and they became very common. They did have one big advantage - the patients could always see a nurse to attract attention, and the nurses could easily see how patients were. Not all steps forward are good and I feel modern hospitals might gain in privacy but lose in other things :-)

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Jun/2013 19:43:49

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009 No need for apologies - I'm still replying to comments people left 2 weeks ago! :)

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    billh35

    • 17/Jun/2013 08:54:20

    A lot of people owe their lives to this building and the work carried out there. Pioneering work in cardiac and coronary care led to the invention and development of mobile defibrillation equipment by Prof. Frank Pantridge in the 1960's which led on to the world's first cardiac ambulance: KARRIER AMBULANCE USED IN BELFAST in the 70s and which eventually led to the development of the wall mounted machines which are everywhere these days. Throughout "The Troubles" the A&E department pioneered work in trauma care and heralded the expression "the golden hour" for emergency medical care.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Jun/2013 09:40:49

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks Bill! A well-deserved hat tip to a great institution - we have those very "wall mounted machines" dotted around Library Towers...

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 11/Nov/2013 22:45:20

    From the other side "Dunville Park, Belfast" - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000332177/Image?lookfor=http:... [I was sniffing around for Dunville stuff]

  • profile

    billh35

    • 12/Nov/2013 15:15:45

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] This is a slightly unusual view of a a corner of Dunville Park. A Belfast Corporation Transport Daimler Fleetline is used as a barricade to block Sorella Street at the side of Dunville Park on the Grosvenor Road in 1969.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 08/Jan/2020 06:07:47

    Reverse view on the double: Dunville Park in Belfast