Gothic Grandeur Gloriously Guarded

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Where: Cork, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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This beautiful shot from the stereo pairs shows a fine church in an unknown location. The initial title was too long so a wee bit of alliteration to start your day:-)

Location Identified as Saint Fin Barre's Cathedral, (Irish: Ardeaglais Naomh Fionnbarra) is a cathedral of the Church of Ireland in Cork city, Ireland. It is in the ecclesiastical province of Dublin. Begun in 1863, the cathedral was the first major work of the Victorian architect William Burges. Previously the cathedral of the Diocese of Cork, it is now one of three cathedrals in the Diocese of Cork, Cloyne and Ross.

Photographers: Frederick Holland Mares, James Simonton

Contributor: John Fortune Lawrence

Collection: The Stereo Pairs Photograph Collection

Date: between ca. 1876-1883

NLI Ref: STP_2969

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 18104
thestereopairsphotographcollection lawrencecollection stereographicnegatives jamessimonton frederickhollandmares johnfortunelawrence williammervynlawrence nationallibraryofireland finbarres cathedral saintfinbarrescathedral ardeaglaisnaomhfionnbarra churchofireland ireland cocork munster irelandwilliamburges dioceseofcork dioceseofcorkcloyneandross corkcity g locationidentified

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  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 05/Jun/2015 07:37:32

    St Fin Barre's Cathedral, Cork?

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 05/Jun/2015 07:38:35

    Cork Cathederal

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 05/Jun/2015 07:39:34

    Plus the back of it.

  • profile
  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 05/Jun/2015 07:42:57

    Good Grief, Gorgeous Granite!

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 05/Jun/2015 07:43:15

    According to the DIA record, the towers and spires were only erected in 1876-8.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 05/Jun/2015 07:45:50

    Whereas the NIAH claims the towers and spires were compeleted in 1876. "The cost of completion exceeded £100,000, despite the original specification that it not exceed £15,000."

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Jun/2015 07:48:59

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] The NIAH says: Cork limestone was used throughout.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 05/Jun/2015 07:54:23

    The Cathedral website says: The towers and spires were not completed until 1879. The cathedral is built of Cork limestone and the interior of Bath stone and the walls are lined with red Cork marble.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 05/Jun/2015 07:58:37

    There's a Lawrence shot pre-towers in the NLI.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 05/Jun/2015 08:11:14

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] so earliest date is 1876 - I have made the change.

  • profile

    robinparkes

    • 05/Jun/2015 08:18:25

    I was there five years ago and was suitably impressed but knew the limitations of my camera so I took this. www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/14066730218/in/album-7...

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 05/Jun/2015 08:22:07

    Saturday April 8th 1878 was the day on which

    "the laying of the top stone of the western tower and spires of the Protestant Cathedral, Cork, was performed by the Right Rev. David Gregg, Bishop. Lines of bunting spanned the space between the towers and a large number of ladies and gentlemen attended to witness the event. The spires, which give a splendid finish to the structure, were erected at the expense of Mr. George Wise and Mr. William Crawford, and in future they will bear the names of their benefactors. After the ceremony his lordship addressed those assembled. The bellringers of the cathedral afterwards rung out a merry peal"
    according to Freeman's Journal the following Monday.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 05/Jun/2015 08:23:47

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner So the DIA was right then :-)

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/Jun/2015 08:25:57

    Golly! Great gradation, graininess, granularity, and grayscale! www.photographytips.com/page.cfm/2019

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 05/Jun/2015 08:40:56

    The Morning Post (London), Saturday, May 10, 1862finbar

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 05/Jun/2015 08:43:24

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Sorry Niall. Should have 'lliterated Lordy, Lovely Limestone!

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 05/Jun/2015 08:51:05

    If any of ye have nagging points about photos here that you want to investigate further, Ancestry's Irish and UK records are free to access until Sunday night, including a Thom's Directory for 1904, and RIC records, 1816-1921. See the list of records here... Don't know if an Australian IP address will work, [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia].

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 05/Jun/2015 09:06:00

    Building work was interrupted in 1870 (The Belfast News-Letter, Thursday, June 30, 1870):

    CORK, TUESDAY NIGHT - The strikes continue here, and the excitement is as great as before. The city, during the greater portion of the day, was paraded by mobs on strike intimidating every one if they did not leave work. The mob first visited Saint Finbarr's Cathedral and compelled the labourers there to strike work. The skilled workmen being unable to go on without them the works have been stopped, as also at all the other buildings going on in the city.
    Also on strike were hackney car-drivers, shoemakers, seamen, firemen at the Cork Steamship Company and "large bodies of women" of unspecified professions. No mention of librarians.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 05/Jun/2015 09:15:09

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Seems to work with my Hong Kong (I think. It may also be Singapore.) IP address...

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 05/Jun/2015 09:16:56

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Oooh, excellent!

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 05/Jun/2015 09:39:07

    GREAT GALES! GUSHING GAS! (Somebody stop me! :) There was a very strong gale in Cork on Sunday, 11 February 1894:

    At about 6:30 o’clock last night a tree on the southern side of the entrance of St Finbarr’s Cathedral was blown down, and when falling it struck the spandril of the fine lamp over the entrance, smashing it in atoms. The bells were ringing for service at the time, but fortunately no person was passing in. A short time previously a number of children were playing about the place. Immediately after the occurrence, Mr Peter Doolan, Superintendent of Public Lighting, and a man from the Gas Office were on the scene, and plugged the gas pipe through which the gas was escaping. The damage is estimated at £36.
    (Irish Examiner, 12 February 1894) Also, a technical insight into gas lighting in the 1890s from a meeting of Cork Corporation — had never really thought about this before. Just assumed the light was on or off:
    That the power of the lamp near the eastern entrance to St Finbarr’s Cathedral be increased to 25 feet per hour up to 10 p.m., and then reduced to five feet per hour.
    (Irish Examiner, 7 December 1892)

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/Jun/2015 09:46:28

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks Carol. Seems to want me to use the Australian site which requires $$. But there might be ways around using a VPN like Hola - sshh don't tell anyone! Hands off my metadata!

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 05/Jun/2015 09:57:50

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Loose lips, etc.

  • profile

    Inverarra

    • 05/Jun/2015 10:16:23

    Many thanks Carol, for the tip about free access this weekend to Ancestry's Irish and UK records.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/Jun/2015 10:43:35

    From an 1881 "Handbook to the Cathedral Church of St. Fin Barre, Cork. With engravings and ground plan" via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/] on Flickr - [https://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/11278362235/][https://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/11148081154/]plus a few more illustrations here - www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000638047 . The whole book is downloadable in PDF form, but might be an ENORMOUS file - my computer says 'no' ...

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 05/Jun/2015 11:05:28

    An article in Aberdeen Weekly Journal on Thursday, February 19, 1891, describes the cathedral as "a perfect gem of architecture, built at a cost of over £100,000, and superbly decorated." So much for they £15,000 they budgeted for in 1862. It goes on "The latter part of the work, however, is not yet finished" and "Here the organ is sunk in a pit behind the choir - a most curious arrangement, but resorted to in order to prevent the organ pipes obscuring a beautiful painted window." From corkcathedral.webs.com/the-cathedral-organ

    The West Gallery position, while excellent for the organ itself, must have posed problems when the choir at the East End had to be accompanied. After continued controversy, Dean Madden proposed that the organ be moved and, to avoid obscuring the stained glass windows and mosaics, a large pit, 14 ft. deep, was dug in the North Transept. In 1889 the organ was moved into this chamber by the Cork firm T.W. Megahy so that only the tops of the tallest pipes were showing. He added three ‘pneumatic machines’ to the action and three new stops - though it is not entirely clear which these were.

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 05/Jun/2015 11:31:57

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] You're more than welcome!

  • profile

    Sunny Harry

    • 05/Jun/2015 20:14:58

    A rear view of the church here www.flickr.com/photos/frankcawley/9556120262/sizes/h/ they say when the golden angle falls from the roof, then that's the end of Cork. It almost happened a few years back. The church roof was undergoing repairs. A latchico decided to climb up the scaffoldiong and see if he could steal the angel. The gadai did not succeed and Cork is still safe today..... You can really appreciate the immense scale, and craftsmanship of the work from the inside www.flickr.com/photos/frankcawley/9556171574/sizes/l

  • profile

    silverio10

    • 08/Jun/2015 19:46:44

    Muy buena serie de fotos antiguas .

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 08/May/2019 06:15:40

    Previously: "Church with square tower of rubble masonry" is the original St Finbarre's Cathedral, Cork