River and weir at Ballyshannon

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Where: Donegal, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1880

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Leaving the French nobility behind, today we visit rural Ireland in the Stereo Pairs collection. This fine view of a river with bridge and weir has a super POV and is very nicely composed. The masses of wild flowers in the foreground make it quite idyllic, but we questioned whether the weir standing up to a winter flood....

.... and indeed the weir is now gone from (as the team have established) this stretch of the River Erne near Ballyshannon.

Thanks to sharon.corbet, beachcomberaustralia, derangedlemur, and Vab2009 for the contributions - and especially O Mac for establishing the location and Niall McAuley for helping refine the date. Have a great weekend all!


Photographers: Frederick Holland Mares, James Simonton

Contributor: John Fortune Lawrence

Collection: The Stereo Pairs Photograph Collection

Date: ca. 1860-1883 (but likely 1878-1882)

NLI Ref: STP_2370

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 17479
thestereopairsphotographcollection lawrencecollection stereographicnegatives jamessimonton frederickhollandmares johnfortunelawrence williammervynlawrence nationallibraryofireland ballyshannon countydonegal weir

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  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 18/Sep/2015 07:44:52

    This similar shot claims to be of Strabane, Co. Tyrone.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 18/Sep/2015 08:32:47

    Is it Londonderry? Trying to reconcile the bridge and spires ...

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 18/Sep/2015 08:53:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] It's certainly similar - the church is in the right place and orientation, for example, but there's not that many piers on the bridge now, and there isn't on the 6" survey either.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 18/Sep/2015 08:57:49

    The magic of streetview makes it look a lot less like Strabane. I think it's somewhere else.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 18/Sep/2015 09:06:26

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Yeah, I've been looking elsewhere too.

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 18/Sep/2015 09:20:10

    It's Ballyshannon , Co Donegal. Streetview

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 18/Sep/2015 09:25:19

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] A Lawrence version from the same angle. ETA: Make that two...

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 18/Sep/2015 09:28:46

    French took a few from the same spot. catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000040530 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000339883 and a zoomable catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000520039

  • profile

    Vab2009

    • 18/Sep/2015 09:28:47

    Another view of it digital.ucd.ie/view/ivrla:10671

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 18/Sep/2015 09:40:10

    [Cancel Londonderry ! ] A new "bridge was originally constructed in 1946/7 to replace an important fourteen arch bridge, built c. 1680 and widened c. 1850, that was demolished as part of the Cathleen's Falls Hydroelectric Scheme (see 40852084). Five arches at the north end of this earlier bridge were demolished to accommodate the tailrace of this scheme. The surviving arches to the south end of the bridge were apparently later infilled and the road was subsequently widened. The stone for the cladding apparently came from demolished buildings in the Ballyshannon area (O'Keefe and Simington 1991), including from the Rock Barracks to the south side of the town. It is likely that much of the fabric of the earlier bridge was also reused to clad the present bridge. ... " From - www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/search.jsp?type=record&...

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 18/Sep/2015 09:47:45

    The polygonal apse on St. Patrick's is from 1860.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 18/Sep/2015 09:54:21

    25" OSI

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 18/Sep/2015 10:01:43

    This former bank building, clearly visible here, is from 1878.

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 18/Sep/2015 10:13:06

    There is an elaborate fish pass with a bailiffs tower to be seen in the Lawerance photo. I wonder when it was built? catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000520039

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 18/Sep/2015 10:32:57

    I think we should maybe see the courthouse if it was there, built in 1881-82.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 18/Sep/2015 10:35:26

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Here's a painting from the 1930's/40's with the equivalent of Flickr Notes on it. It claims the weir is called Corry McGinty, and wasn't used after WWI.

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 18/Sep/2015 11:00:41

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks. I couldnt figure out whether the little stone tower was there before or after the pitched roof house seen above.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Sep/2015 16:31:09

    Ballyshannon it is then! Based on the dates which [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] suggests, our photographer would have to wait another few years before heading to the well-advertised Ballyshannon Agriculture Show. Thanks all!

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 18/Sep/2015 22:57:34

    The Popularity of the Eel in Ballyshannon www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/21336260038/in/datepos... Fishing Weirs of the River Erne Arthur E. J. Went The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Vol. 75, No. 4 (Dec., 1945), pp. 213-223

  • profile

    B-59

    • 21/Sep/2015 07:15:28

    View in 2013: goo.gl/maps/9a8VtJ9TEkm

  • profile

    silverio10

    • 21/Sep/2015 21:29:19

    Una buena serie de fotos antiguas .